Free Bleed Poppet Valves

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csrosenberry

Member
Aug 20, 2013
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I am going to experiment with these. Do they have to be installed in the comp tubes? I see now reason why they couldn't be utilized in the rebound tubes. Same affect so my simple mind thinks.Could you not run one in the rebound tube as well as the comp tube where the piston is at ride height if more free bleed is desired?How effective are they. I just looked at a 4.0 poppet that is setup with a 2-bleed. I am guessing looking at it, its the equivalent to one of the bleeds pulled out of the piston.Don't know if this topic will take off but if you have anything to add I am looking to utilize them on my next re-valve.
 

csrosenberry

Member
Aug 20, 2013
55
0
6
I looked at some cut-away valve pictures online and then took a quick look at mine today by pulling one valve out and came to that conclusion, but wanted to see what others thought. Here is my next question. Lets say they were in the long comp tube that covers the ride height position. But this valve is cracked open a decent amount to allow free flow. How effective is running the free bleed in that tube if the valve opens a lot and easily? The fluid is just going to find the path of least resistance so as soon as the valve cracks its just going to go around leaving the holes ineffective. This is why I started looking into rebound tubes for placement. My thought is the valve will be pinned in place due to the spring and reverse flow of fluid if placed on the rebound side. This will keep them active and effective until the tubes can't flow enough and the hydro lock. Now in my case the long rebound tube covers from right out of bump zone until the last 1" of stroke. Would you even consider doing this? It wouldn't only be ride height it essentially would nobe the whole stroke. Mind you I have a light car with massive shocks and a motion ratio of about 1.3:1.
 
Last edited:

csrosenberry

Member
Aug 20, 2013
55
0
6
I looked at some cut-away valve pictures online and then took a quick look at mine today by pulling one valve out and came to that conclusion, but wanted to see what others thought. Here is my next question. Lets say they were in the long comp tube that covers the ride height position. But this valve is cracked open a decent amount to allow free flow. How effective is running the free bleed in that tube if the valve opens a lot and easily? The fluid is just going to find the path of least resistance so as soon as the valve cracks its just going to go around leaving the holes ineffective. This is why I started looking into rebound tubes for placement. My thought is the valve will be pinned in place due to the spring and reverse flow of fluid if placed on the rebound side. This will keep them active and effective until the holes can't flow enough and the hydro lock. Now in my case the long rebound tube covers from right out of bump zone until the last 1" of stroke. Would you even consider doing this? It wouldn't only be ride height it essentially would be the whole stroke. Mind you I have a light car with massive shocks and a motion ratio of about 1.3:1.
 

partybarge_pilot

Uno mas Cervesa!
May 14, 2004
9,867
643
113
Easton, KS
Depends on the springs you have in the valves. It will mostly effect how it rides in small chatter. As soon as the valve opens up the bleed hole won't be doing much.
 

csrosenberry

Member
Aug 20, 2013
55
0
6
Right, so that's why I was thinking in the rebound tube. They'll work there until they can no longer keep up with the flow rate and the comp tubes would work just as they were. But would anyone be concerned with free bleed throughout most of the stroke? To me it would be like utilizing the piston free bleeds to get the car to handle the chop better, but in this case they would not effect the piston and stack. Once into the full valving zone or bump zone, all bleeds that are plugged on the piston add to dampening forces. And by utilizing free bleed on the valves rather than the piston the piston valving is more effective because fluid is going to pass on the shims for all movement greater than the flow capacity of the poppet valve free bleed.Next Question is this. Does anyone know which side they would be more effective on. If the fluid can flow either way it seems like it wouldn't matter but I am going to ask. Lets say its a 2-hole free bleed valve. Is it more effective on the compression tube over the rebound tube?
 

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