Sort of like a Jeepspeed XJ

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stockerwithalocker

Junior Member
Aug 17, 2007
9
0
1
CA
To build a home brew press i use a piece of 1/2” all thread supported on each end of the axle tube with the bearing install pucks you rent from autozone (the id is a little over 1/2”) with nuts on each end holding the all thread in place. A 2/2” drive 36mm socket against the seal and a 1/2” nut/washer to press against the socket. Makes it a one man job. Time consuming part is threading the nut off to flip the socket around for the other seal.
 

84projectford

Senior Member
Sep 8, 2010
840
276
63
Phoenix Az
Do tell...old wise grouchy one
he had explained to me that more bump means more progressive stop. makes the initial hit softer but does a better job at slowing the back end down before you are through its travel.

i like running more oil in the bump (10cc from completely full and fully compressed) and then only 25-50psi in the bump. takes the harshness out of the initial hit but you know they are still there.
 

SByota

Senior Member
Jul 16, 2003
339
91
28
he had explained to me that more bump means more progressive stop. makes the initial hit softer but does a better job at slowing the back end down before you are through its travel.

i like running more oil in the bump (10cc from completely full and fully compressed) and then only 25-50psi in the bump. takes the harshness out of the initial hit but you know they are still there.
I’ll see how this goes since it’s done. I tried running 50psi in the bumps, but they still felt super harsh.

I only took out like 90cc of oil from each one when I had them apart. Fill is 125cc. So I’m thinking they had a large nitrogen volume, so they ramped up super fast and were basically too much for me.

Are you measuring the oil with the top cap off? So I would fill it with oil, bleed it, brim it to the top (bump fully collapsed) then pull 10cc out?

I like the idea of a small nitrogen volume for a softer bump.
 

84projectford

Senior Member
Sep 8, 2010
840
276
63
Phoenix Az
I’ll see how this goes since it’s done. I tried running 50psi in the bumps, but they still felt super harsh.

I only took out like 90cc of oil from each one when I had them apart. Fill is 125cc. So I’m thinking they had a large nitrogen volume, so they ramped up super fast and were basically too much for me.

Are you measuring the oil with the top cap off? So I would fill it with oil, bleed it, brim it to the top (bump fully collapsed) then pull 10cc out?

I like the idea of a small nitrogen volume for a softer bump.
i pull the whole shrader off the top and then yes, fill to damn near the top, bleed, then all the way up and suck out 10cc.
 

partybarge_pilot

Uno mas Cervesa!
May 14, 2004
10,272
1,000
113
Easton, KS
Ok

Your bump has to do X amount of work. Doing it in 4" gives it more time for the valving to work and you need less spring. Doing it in 2" will require much more spring.

Now, damping is pretty shitty in these as they are emulsion. Putting more oil in them will make the foam thicker and make them more effective at damping versus just working off the spring.

Now for the spring side. Your pressure is like preload. The oil volume/airspace sets your spring rate. Just adding pressure is like cranking down way to soft coils attempting to keep it from bottoming. It will make the initial contact harsh and still not prevent bottoming. You need just enough pressure to make them extend fully. Then adjust your airspace to get the spring rate you need to keep from ass ramming them home.

Apparently Fox has bumps with IFP's now. Go Fox!
 
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SByota

Senior Member
Jul 16, 2003
339
91
28
Ok

Your bump has to do X amount of work. Doing it in 4" gives it more time for the valving to work and you need less spring. Doing it in 2" will require much more spring.

Now, damping is pretty shitty in these as they are emulsion. Putting more oil in them will make the foam thicker and make them more effective at damping versus just working off the spring.

Now for the spring side. Your pressure is like preload. The oil volume/airspace sets your spring rate. Just adding pressure is like cranking down way to soft coils attempting to keep it from bottoming. It will make the initial contact harsh and still not prevent bottoming. You need just enough pressure to make them extend fully. Then adjust your airspace to get the spring rate you need to keep from ass ramming them home.

Apparently Fox has bumps with IFP's now. Go Fox!
Totally makes sense now. Thank you for the knowledge
 

SByota

Senior Member
Jul 16, 2003
339
91
28
Three hours of work to change a $5 seal. Four wheel parts had the Dana Spicer seal in stock. Every other parts house wanted $15 for no name seal.

I remembered that when I rebuilt the front axle, I fucked up a seal by pressing it in crooked. I grabbed one from Autozone to get the axle together. Guess which one was leaking....

No visible damage to the seal or axle sealing surface. Seal spring was still in place. Maybe I didn’t set it straight or it was a shit part.

This was the first time the cover has been off since I built the axle with new gears. Everything looked great.

Swapped out the seal and put the whole mess back together. Filled it up with fresh Lucas gear oil.

Helper was of course supervising/helping, with his own tools.
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5B5FAE7B-359C-4954-AA21-E4AD46F7A402.jpeg
 

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