The in-law truck

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partybarge_pilot

Uno mas Cervesa!
May 14, 2004
17,871
14,830
113
Boringsville
Those shorty resi's are easy to fuck up if your not paying attention. The BP on the other hand should not have been an issue.

If they didn't blow apart or blow the seals out, they weren't really hydrolocked.
 

3.0 power

Senior Member
Sep 29, 2011
1,508
851
113
ViStA
Those shorty resi's are easy to fuck up if your not paying attention. The BP on the other hand should not have been an issue.

If they didn't blow apart or blow the seals out, they weren't really hydrolocked.
I pulled the shocks off today one of the bypass you can only push about 60%in then it springs back out the other bypass goes in about 80% and that it the shaft doesn’t move at all even with 200 psi but you can pull it back out by hand with out a problem
 

84projectford

Senior Member
Staff member
Sep 8, 2010
3,413
4,042
113
Phoenix Az
I pulled the shocks off today one of the bypass you can only push about 60%in then it springs back out
Is that with no nitrogen in the resi? if so, then its like 96 said above.

the other bypass goes in about 80% and that it the shaft doesn’t move at all even with 200 psi but you can pull it back out by hand with out a problem
you dont want 200psi in a bottom mount resi, thats trying to keep the shock piston up in the body and not come back out like you are stating.


if you release all the nitrogen from the resi (take the shrader core out) and then pull the end cap off, you can compress the shock as you watch the IFP move. if you cant compress the shock all the way without the IFP wanting to exit the resi body, its a hydrolock issue. if you can and there is still room inside the resi for the IFP to come back farther, its NOT a hydrolock issue.

WARNING: if there is nitrogen in the shock body due to a leaking seal, you can have the IFP blow out the back of the resi as you try to get the end cap off. if you fear there may be nitrogen in the shock body, i usually set the resi hose at the shock body as the highest point, then just crack it loose till you hear the air coming out. it will relieve most of the pressure and make shit safer but wont take it all out. be careful
 

oorracing

<span style="color: orange;">DR Mod</span>
Jan 15, 2006
10,698
277
83
Long Beach Ca
Is that with no nitrogen in the resi? if so, then its like 96 said above.



you dont want 200psi in a bottom mount resi, thats trying to keep the shock piston up in the body and not come back out like you are stating.


if you release all the nitrogen from the resi (take the shrader core out) and then pull the end cap off, you can compress the shock as you watch the IFP move. if you cant compress the shock all the way without the IFP wanting to exit the resi body, its a hydrolock issue. if you can and there is still room inside the resi for the IFP to come back farther, its NOT a hydrolock issue.

WARNING: if there is nitrogen in the shock body due to a leaking seal, you can have the IFP blow out the back of the resi as you try to get the end cap off. if you fear there may be nitrogen in the shock body, i usually set the resi hose at the shock body as the highest point, then just crack it loose till you hear the air coming out. it will relieve most of the pressure and make shit safer but wont take it all out. be careful
Wrong. Doesn’t matter where the resi port is, the IFP is still putting pressure on the oil chamber which tries to displace the shaft and piston which shoves it out of the cylinder. 200 psi is a standard pressure for shocks, it’s what i typically charge all of my customers shocks to. The resi port matters on compression and where the displaced fluid has to travel. Top port bypasses can easily shove the fluid through the hose up too and not force the oil through the piston whereas a bottom resi forces the displaced fluid through the piston and out the bottom of the shock.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

84projectford

Senior Member
Staff member
Sep 8, 2010
3,413
4,042
113
Phoenix Az
Wrong. Doesn’t matter where the resi port is, the IFP is still putting pressure on the oil chamber which tries to displace the shaft and piston which shoves it out of the cylinder. 200 psi is a standard pressure for shocks, it’s what i typically charge all of my customers shocks to. The resi port matters on compression and where the displaced fluid has to travel. Top port bypasses can easily shove the fluid through the hose up too and not force the oil through the piston whereas a bottom resi forces the displaced fluid through the piston and out the bottom of the shock.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
yup, good point. im thinking of fluid flow wrong on that.
 

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