Whoaaa, I must be tripping .... Project GhettoTrip. G3 Bitches.

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Turboyota

Senior Member
Mar 29, 2017
3,255
1,637
113
Yucaipa
I have done 1.5x0.250” 4130 for my trailing arms and 1.25x0.250” 4130 for my tierods—both in my JD2 model 3.

You’re a big dude—it’ll be fine.
 

Bertismyname

member
Oct 1, 2018
925
317
63
San Diego
I really like the tsugami chucker lathes. So much faster and easier to set up than a single tool post or buying multiple quick change tool holders.
 

partybarge_pilot

Uno mas Cervesa!
May 14, 2004
10,539
1,346
113
Easton, KS
I really like the tsugami chucker lathes. So much faster and easier to set up than a single tool post or buying multiple quick change tool holders.
Till the controller over heats and the spindle takes off then the slide drags all your tools across the spindle.

Hopefully they have improved. Capto holders are where its at.
 

Bertismyname

member
Oct 1, 2018
925
317
63
San Diego
The real reason for the multiple posts.

Till the controller over heats and the spindle takes off then the slide drags all your tools across the spindle.

Hopefully they have improved. Capto holders are where its at.
That's all fine and dandy. I'm not talking about production machines. I'm talking about a machine that can be had within the budget of most people here. I would love to own a Hardinge tool room lathe. I dont have that kind of money. Or the need for that kind of accuracy. You made a similar comment when I brought up Hurco mills. Same deal. I'm talking about people stepping out of the 19th century when talking about machines for home use. Southbends and Bridgeport's have a huge fan club. I'm not saying that they are bad machines. What I'm talking about is the ability to bring some of the production type machines to people's garages. I don't have experience with controllers burning up on tsunamis. I do have experience with them running truer than a south bend. I have experience with hurcos having more rigidity and running smoother than Bridgeport's. All of these machines can be bought at a price that doesn't break the budget and are easily learned. I would love to buy a haas. But, I recently wired a building for G.A. and to my surprise 1 haas. The rest of the machines in the tool room were prototrak, and 1 old bridgport. To be honest if I was to buy a new machining center for personal use , it 1 would not be a haas, 2 it would probably be proto track. I've known more than one person with a haas machine and they had plenty of problems as well.
That being said. For those looking for a machine for home use I recommend a few things.
1 look for ways that still have the scraping Mark's.
2 if it doesn't work smooth as silk, it has some issues that you probably cant dix at home.
3 if it looks nasty, it is.
4 no rust anywhere.

I learned the hard way by buying equipment that was cheap and neglected. Cheap purchase price does not mean that you got a good deal. For home use almost any machine will work. As long as it's not sloppy and can hold a tolerance.
 

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